Quick Brown Foxes | Jasmine Reese II: Living as a Bicycle Nomad

Photo by: Esther Lorenz

Photo by: Esther Lorenz

Words by Jasmine Reese II

I think the biggest part of stepping out of a comfort zone is dealing with the guilt. Everyday, you're going against the grain of what's considered the norm. Therefore, you experience peer and self-inflicted emotions of guilt. Am I doing the right thing? Is it ok to be me? Is it ok to live like this? Your peers might say, 'Don't you want to settle down?' 'Don't you want a secure or stable life?' 'Don't you just want to be like the rest of us?' However, once you discover your own groove, embrace your chosen path and learn to love yourself, those feelings melt away and are replaced with an amazing calm, sense of accomplishment and happiness.

Photo by: Susan Edwards

Photo by: Susan Edwards

Living as a bicycle nomad is not easy. It's a mental challenge more than a physical one, but the physical challenges are definitely formidable. But this life of transience, going from one place to the next, packing up with no planned destination in mind, is a bit stressful at first. Why? Because it's so outside of the realm of normal and you are reminded of that on a daily basis when you interact with others and the farther away you get from your family and friends. But as I made friends on the road, experienced kindness and love, saw amazing landscapes, broke down my own physical and mental barriers, I reached a groove. I began to like the person I was and continue to become.

 

I noticed at one point that my life prior was sad with moments of happiness, but now it's happy with moments of sadness. I am living the way I want to live now. That's beautiful. And I get to do it with my amazing dog, Fiji, and the wonderful encouragement of my family, friends and acquaintances from the road (who quickly turn into family). So, my only advice to people who decide to step out of the box is don't be surprised by the initial pain. It's supposed to hurt because you're stripping away so much of who you were to become a new you. Embrace it, and then the opportunities become endless.

More about Jasmine and Fiji can be found on their FijaPaw facebook page!


I have been following Jasmine for a bit now, and her journey is a constant source of inspiration for me. As a violinist myself, I love the idea of learning the violin on your own terms, from folks from all over. And if you visit her page and watch her videos, you will see and hear the beauty that has resulted from Jasmine's hard work and dedication at "road school". I am so proud of what this woman has accomplished and glad that she has her invaluable buddy Fiji along for the ride. Climbing is hard enough when it's just you, could you imagine toting a dog, dog food, and most of your possessions in a trailer up those climbs? Endless respect!!!!